When you’re moving in the right direction, expect difficulty.

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Expect difficulty when you do what’s right. Great opportunity is often accompanied by great opposition. The apostle Paul said of the work in Ephesus, ‘A great door for effective work has opened to me, and there are many who oppose me’ (1 Cor. 16:9). He chose to think primarily about the great open door, not the daunting opponents!

Unquestionable Character: A 21-day Study in Stewardship

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Remember that Satan is the accuser of believers. He delights in heaping guilt feelings upon you…. When you feel Satan’s arrows of accusation, you are probably on the right track.

– May 15, Jesus Calling, by Sarah Young


Image: Eon Images

How to cure your fear of failure

How to overcome your fear of failure

Trent Nelson:

The fear of failure is nothing more than an irrational panic over the… unknown variables that [you] equate to impending doom. …And disappears completely when you focus on reasonable outcomes.

“When you find yourself distracted by impending failures, it almost always means you have a distorted view of yourself, and what role you play in your own business….

“Falling flat on your face is an essential a part of the job, and without it you’re bound to stunt your growth. …By rejecting the notion that you could-possibly fu– up, you’re restricting your access to one of the most sought-after resources on the planet: Hindsight….

“The best way to overcome failure is to see it for what it really is: A necessary speedbump on the way to success.”

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Read Trent Wilson’s blog post on fear of failure

Don’t just talk/think about God; talk TO God

Look up: talk to God

In this devotional by John Piper, he looks at the 23rd Psalm, and how the writer — King David — switches back and forth between talking about God (“He”) and to God (“You”):

The lesson I have learned from this form is that it is good not to talk very long about God without talking to God.

Every Christian is at least an amateur theologian — that is, a person who tries to understand the character and ways of God and then put that into words….

But what I have learned from David in Psalm 23 and other psalms, is that I should interweave my theology with prayer. I should frequently interrupt my talking about God by talking to God.

Not far behind the theological sentence, “God is generous,” should come the prayerful sentence, “Thank you, God.”

On the heels of, “God is glorious,” should come, “I adore your glory.”

What I have come to see is that this is the way it must be if we are feeling God’s reality in our hearts as well as describing it with our heads.’

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