Van Gogh on the struggle to create beautiful things

Van Gogh's Olive Grove

Vincent van Gogh:

I long so much to make beautiful things. But beautiful things require effort and disappointment and perseverance.”

Another good one, by Pablo Picasso:

Inspiration exists, but it has to find us working.”

 

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Let’s get to work!

Farmer, headed to work

Stephen King, from On Writing:

Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration to come, the rest of us just get up and go to work.

Also from On Writing:

But it’s writing, damn it, not washing the car or putting on eyeliner. If you can take it seriously, we can do business. If you can’t or won’t, it’s time for you to close the book and do something else.

Wash the car, maybe.”

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photo credit: bernat… via photopin cc

Ray Bradbury on writing

INTERVIEWER (The Art of Fiction No. 203, The Paris Review):

In Zen in the Art of Writing, you wrote that early on in your career you made lists of nouns as a way to generate story ideas: the Jar, the Cistern, the Lake, the Skeleton. Do you still do this?

RAY BRADBURY:

Not as much, because I just automatically generate ideas now. But in the old days I knew I had to dredge my subconscious, and the nouns did this. I learned this early on. Three things are in your head: First, everything you have experienced from the day of your birth until right now…. Then, how you reacted to those events in the minute of their happening, whether they were disastrous or joyful. Those are two things you have in your mind to give you material. Then, separate from the living experiences are all the art experiences you’ve had, the things you’ve learned from other writers, artists, poets, film directors, and composers. So all of this is in your mind as a fabulous mulch and you have to bring it out. How do you do that? I did it by making lists of nouns and then asking, What does each noun mean? You can go and make up your own list right now and it would be different than mine. The night. The crickets. The train whistle. The basement. The attic. The tennis shoes. The fireworks. All these things are very personal. Then, when you get the list down, you begin to word-associate around it. You ask, Why did I put this word down? What does it mean to me? Why did I put this noun down and not some other word? …You have to write the way you see things. I tell people, “Make a list of ten things you hate and tear them down in a short story or poem. Make a list of ten things you love and celebrate them.” When I wrote Fahrenheit 451 I hated book burners and I loved libraries. So there you are.