Success is a side effect

Viktor Frankl, from Man’s Search for Meaning:

…success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue, and it only does so as the unintended side effect of one’s personal dedication to a cause greater than oneself….”

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How to cure your fear of failure

How to overcome your fear of failure

Trent Nelson:

The fear of failure is nothing more than an irrational panic over the… unknown variables that [you] equate to impending doom. …And disappears completely when you focus on reasonable outcomes.

“When you find yourself distracted by impending failures, it almost always means you have a distorted view of yourself, and what role you play in your own business….

“Falling flat on your face is an essential a part of the job, and without it you’re bound to stunt your growth. …By rejecting the notion that you could-possibly fu– up, you’re restricting your access to one of the most sought-after resources on the planet: Hindsight….

“The best way to overcome failure is to see it for what it really is: A necessary speedbump on the way to success.”

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Read Trent Wilson’s blog post on fear of failure

How to lead: Collaboration vs. control

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Reporter Rob Asghar, via a Forbes article on how corporate CEOs could learn a thing or two about leading from college presidents:

As one college president told me, ‘You don’t say, ‘‘Professor Smith, I need you to make this change.’’ Instead, you say, ‘‘Professor Smith, I have a great idea I’d like to run past you. I really need your input in order to make this work, and I wonder if you have any thoughts about how to improve my idea and how to implement it?’’’”

There are always plenty of distractions

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C.S. Lewis, in “Learning in Wartime,” a sermon he gave at Oxford in 1939.

There are always plenty of rivals to our work. We are always falling in love or quarreling, looking for jobs or fearing to lose them, getting ill and recovering, following public affairs. If we let ourselves, we shall always be waiting for some distraction or other to end before we can really get down to our work. The only people who achieve much are those who want [their goal] so badly that they seek it while the conditions are still unfavorable. Favorable conditions may never come.

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Quote via Elise Amyx

Image via Shaaark!

 

Let’s get to work!

Farmer, headed to work

Stephen King, from On Writing:

Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration to come, the rest of us just get up and go to work.

Also from On Writing:

But it’s writing, damn it, not washing the car or putting on eyeliner. If you can take it seriously, we can do business. If you can’t or won’t, it’s time for you to close the book and do something else.

Wash the car, maybe.”

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photo credit: bernat… via photopin cc

Workaholics aren’t heroes.

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Jason Fried and Heinemeier Hansson (co-creaters of Basecamp) in their book Rework:

Workaholics aren’t heroes. They don’t save the day, they just use it up. The real hero is already home because she figured out a faster way to get things done.

(The illustration is from their book, too, and my real reason for this post: Just to share that bit of simple but brilliant communication.)